publicdomainthing:

Michelangelo’s Grocery List
16th Century 
OpenCulture

publicdomainthing:

Michelangelo’s Grocery List

16th Century 

OpenCulture

(via archivalia)

speciesbarocus:

Ioannis Goropij Becani - Opera (1580). [x]

speciesbarocus:

Ioannis Goropij Becani - Opera (1580). [x]

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book
This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.
Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book

This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.

Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

(Quelle: archivalia)

archivalia:

"Notgeld" Aachen

archivalia:

"Notgeld" Aachen

Tags: Archivalien

archivalia:

Friday Flowers 8/29/2014 by Sonny Carter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Schriftliches Kulturgut erhalten! Ein Weimarer Appell

Ein Aufruf bei: Stiftung Weimarer Klassik:

[…] Wir appellieren an die Verantwortlichen in Bund, Ländern und Gemeinden, in Kirchen, Vereinen und Stiftungen, in gleicher Weise wie die baulichen Denkmäler auch die gefährdeten Originale der reichen kulturellen und wissenschaftlichen Überlieferung in Deutschland zu sichern!

Zum Appell auf AVVAZ.org

Schriftliches Kulturgut erhalten! Ein Weimarer Appell an Bund, Länder, Gemeinden, Kirchen, Vereine und Stiftungen.



MARGINALIEN
Aus der Privatbibliothek eines Oberlehrers
Angeregt durch die Verewigungen berühmter Leute am Rande zeigen wir hier die  Marginalien Unbekannter.
Hier: Zettelwirtschaft des Oberlehrers
(be continued)
siehe auch:
http://anonymea.tumblr.com/post/91074496261/marginalien-aus-der-privatbibliothek-eines
http://anonymea.tumblr.com/post/80921082118/marginalien-aus-der-privatbibliothek-eines
http://anonymea.tumblr.com/post/64704302818/marginalien-aus-der-privatbibliothek-eines
http://flavorwire.com/394100/classic-books-annotated-by-famous-authors/view-all/
http://archiv.twoday.net/stories/524896707/
archivalia:

Friday Flowers 8/22/2014 by Sonny Carter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

andreasp-rv:

Stadtbibliothek Stuttgart

The communal public library of Stuttgart, Germany.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadtbibliothek_am_Mail%C3%A4nder_Platz

"One of the the world’s foremost academic resources, London’s Warburg Institute Library, is under threat, 80 years after being saved from the Nazis. Martin Kemp argues vehemently for its survival."

A betrayal of trust? The Warburg Library under threat | Blog | Royal Academy of Arts (via archivalia)

(via archivalia)

archivalia:

Elephant saec. XVII. Kiel exhibition: "Under the Sign of the Elephant"
Early Modern Emblemata from North German Collections 

archivalia:

Elephant saec. XVII. Kiel exhibition: "Under the Sign of the Elephant"

Early Modern Emblemata from North German Collections 

(Quelle: archivalia)

erikkwakkel:

Medieval dachshund - Or: drawing with words

Here are three examples of a technique called “micrography”: decorative scenes that are drawn with words written in a tiny script. While there are examples from Latin books made in the West (here is one), the technique is particularly common in medieval Hebrew manuscripts. The drawings are usually found in biblical manuscripts and they appear to be commentaries to the text. The technique, whereby a scribe wrote in the smallest handwriting possible, goes back to the 9th century AD. The examples here, from the 13th century, shows just how entertaining the word-made drawings can be: they are an opportunity for the scribe to frolick in the margins of the page - like drawing a creature that looks like a dachshund.

Pic: London, British Library, Additional MS 21160 (13th century, more about the manuscript here). More about micrography here.

archivalia:

Pythagoras saec. XV

archivalia:

Pythagoras saec. XV